Qigong

Qigong

The practice of Qigong, or “energy work,” has an interesting and sometimes disputed history. Until recently, it had existed freely throughout much of China and was a part of China’s cultural and medical history. Consequently, many schools or styles of practice emerged and evolved under various masters. Unfortunately, today those few Qigong groups who contunue to hold their early morning practice in parks throughout much of China take caution to avoid being viewed as belonging to the Faln Gong movement – which is officially banned by the Chinese government.

Unlike Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong is primarily oriented to healing, health, and wellness. Authentic Medical Qigong (although many schools use this term for conventional Qigong exercises) incorporates Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory and methods in the instruction and practice. While there has been some martial use of Qigong, today there is only a relatively small segment of all students who focus on applications for the “warrior.”

Many of the Qigong methods, techniques, and applications taught at the Morning Light School are those learned from Qigong Grandmaster Zhang Yuanming, who has a demonstrated history of affiliation with some of China’s widely recognized masters. Other methods and applications shown were either learned from earlier teachers or from more recent study of Qigong theory, principles, and practices.

Students should be willing to commit to a period of study of at least six months to fully realize the benefits of pursuing traditional methods and teachings. Less emphasis is given to learning “form” and greater emphasis is given to understanding how to cultivate, circulate, and harmonize internal energy (chi).